Brutally Beautiful

This is the face of a LEGITIMATE Native American. 
Notice that you will find the absence of a headband, buckskin and a bow and arrow. 
If I see you wearing an “Indian Squaw” costume, I will beat your ass DOWN honey. 
This is what a Plus-Sized, Woman of Color looks like. 
RESPECT IT.  RESPECT MY CULTURE. I AM NOT A COSTUME. 

This is the face of a LEGITIMATE Native American. 

Notice that you will find the absence of a headband, buckskin and a bow and arrow. 

If I see you wearing an “Indian Squaw” costume, I will beat your ass DOWN honey. 

This is what a Plus-Sized, Woman of Color looks like. 

RESPECT IT.  RESPECT MY CULTURE. I AM NOT A COSTUME. 


DON’T TREND ON MY CULTURE
Ok Everybody, 
This is specifically one of the reasons that Brutally Beautifull exists. We’re connecting racism and fashion, and here we have a prime example. I am Native American, more specifically I am a registered member of the Oglala Lakota tribe in South Dakota, the poorest county in the entire COUNTRY, I might add. 
Let’s break this down shall we?
1. I AM NOT A COSTUME. As a Native American, dressing up as a Native American when you are NOT and when you are WHITE is WRONG. Period. End of story. You’re wrong, deal with it. It’s extremely hurtful and racist and continues hundreds of years worth of colonialism and genocide that my people still suffer from today. 
2. Dressing up as a race/culture you are NOT is called Cultural Appropriation. One of the reasons this is so bad is that it generalizes Native peoples. There are over 500 recognized tribes in the USA alone, each with their own culture and stories and when you do this, it just reiterates the idea that
 A. It’s okay to dress as a make-believe indian.
 B. That we’re all the same. We’re not, and it’s really hurtful to see your identity  trivialized in such a horrific way. 
3. Dressing up as an “indian” is the same as dressing in Blackface. You know that blackface is wrong, but unfortunately society tells you it’s okay to dress like an Indian. It’s not. It’s JUST like blackface, and as a PoC (Person of Color) I’m telling you that it’s wrong. You need to realize that People of Color have the right to say what is and is not acceptable. I’m telling you as a Native who is thoroughly ACTIVE in my culture, traditions and tribe that it is NOT okay to dress up in such a racist manner. You need to take that opinion, stuff it in your pocket and keep it for later, girlfriend. We get to tell you what’s right and what’s wrong regarding our race. This is wrong. Don’t do it. 
4. When you dress up like “an Indian” then you further propagate the idea that we, as Native/Indigenous Peoples, don’t exist. You get to play Native without actually BEING Native. Don’t come to me with that “one drop indian” bullshit. It isn’t gonna fly here. Unless you know what tribe you come from, are an active participant in that culture and work to further the rights of your people, then that drop of Native blood don’t count for shit in any of our books. We’re not unicorns, mmk? We’re people with real issues going on and we can’t pick and choose which issues are more important than the other. Dressing up like Indians, as if it’s somehow trendy, is just telling of a larger ignorance on our country’s part. 
As Fatshionistas, we HAVE to be aware of what we are putting on our bodies. How shameful is it to put something on that so dehumanizes our fellow women, or people, just because we feel like we have the right to do it, their feelings be damned, the consequences be damned, while we are so stigmatized in this society as it is. If we are not helping our our fellow people, then we are hypocrites. End of story. You know what you put on your body before you do it, don’t claim ignorance as an excuse. 
5. The whole “Dressing up like other races” from white people is called Consuming The Other. You get to play brown. You get to be something exotic and exciting, but without suffering any read consequences that come along with being that race. My people were almost exterminated by this country, my reservation is the poorest in the country, the suicide rate is 400% higher than the rest of the country, the average income on my rez is $8,000 a year, half of the reservation has diabetes, etc. etc. etc. That’s part of being Native, my friend. All of the intergenerational trauma that comes along with it, the oppression and the history that people don’t want to admit to or take responsibility for, the constant dehumanization from your friends and society….that’s what we deal with DAILY. You get to put on a costume and pretend to be something you’re not without dealing with any of these consequences, I don’t. I don’t pretend to play Native, honey, I AM NATIVE. 
Now you need to take that tacky white lie off your body and stuff it in the garbage. You should feel ashamed. 
BTW: Headbands were never a part of ANY Native tribe. There’s nothing funny about this shit. 
For those of you who want less angry/more eloquent details on cultural appropriation, I suggest you go to these links to understand a little bit more before you make such a foolish, foolish mistake. 
Resources: 
Native Appropriations: But Why Can’t I Wear a Hipster Headdress? 
Native Appropriations:  An Open Letter to all the PocaHotties and Indian Warriors
antidotetocommonpoisons:

Thrifting adventures.
1. I bought a full Native American costume and the props to go with it. I just couldn’t resist. Hahaha
$18
2. A dress that magically transforms from 1970’s to 1870’s. I’m not sure why I got this, but I just thought it was kinda pretty. Maybe I’ll write a script for a video that includes the 1800’s or something.
$5
3. Super awesome brand new blazer.
$6
DON’T TREND ON MY CULTURE
Ok Everybody, 
This is specifically one of the reasons that Brutally Beautifull exists. We’re connecting racism and fashion, and here we have a prime example. I am Native American, more specifically I am a registered member of the Oglala Lakota tribe in South Dakota, the poorest county in the entire COUNTRY, I might add. 
Let’s break this down shall we?
1. I AM NOT A COSTUME. As a Native American, dressing up as a Native American when you are NOT and when you are WHITE is WRONG. Period. End of story. You’re wrong, deal with it. It’s extremely hurtful and racist and continues hundreds of years worth of colonialism and genocide that my people still suffer from today. 
2. Dressing up as a race/culture you are NOT is called Cultural Appropriation. One of the reasons this is so bad is that it generalizes Native peoples. There are over 500 recognized tribes in the USA alone, each with their own culture and stories and when you do this, it just reiterates the idea that
 A. It’s okay to dress as a make-believe indian.
 B. That we’re all the same. We’re not, and it’s really hurtful to see your identity  trivialized in such a horrific way. 
3. Dressing up as an “indian” is the same as dressing in Blackface. You know that blackface is wrong, but unfortunately society tells you it’s okay to dress like an Indian. It’s not. It’s JUST like blackface, and as a PoC (Person of Color) I’m telling you that it’s wrong. You need to realize that People of Color have the right to say what is and is not acceptable. I’m telling you as a Native who is thoroughly ACTIVE in my culture, traditions and tribe that it is NOT okay to dress up in such a racist manner. You need to take that opinion, stuff it in your pocket and keep it for later, girlfriend. We get to tell you what’s right and what’s wrong regarding our race. This is wrong. Don’t do it. 
4. When you dress up like “an Indian” then you further propagate the idea that we, as Native/Indigenous Peoples, don’t exist. You get to play Native without actually BEING Native. Don’t come to me with that “one drop indian” bullshit. It isn’t gonna fly here. Unless you know what tribe you come from, are an active participant in that culture and work to further the rights of your people, then that drop of Native blood don’t count for shit in any of our books. We’re not unicorns, mmk? We’re people with real issues going on and we can’t pick and choose which issues are more important than the other. Dressing up like Indians, as if it’s somehow trendy, is just telling of a larger ignorance on our country’s part. 
As Fatshionistas, we HAVE to be aware of what we are putting on our bodies. How shameful is it to put something on that so dehumanizes our fellow women, or people, just because we feel like we have the right to do it, their feelings be damned, the consequences be damned, while we are so stigmatized in this society as it is. If we are not helping our our fellow people, then we are hypocrites. End of story. You know what you put on your body before you do it, don’t claim ignorance as an excuse. 
5. The whole “Dressing up like other races” from white people is called Consuming The Other. You get to play brown. You get to be something exotic and exciting, but without suffering any read consequences that come along with being that race. My people were almost exterminated by this country, my reservation is the poorest in the country, the suicide rate is 400% higher than the rest of the country, the average income on my rez is $8,000 a year, half of the reservation has diabetes, etc. etc. etc. That’s part of being Native, my friend. All of the intergenerational trauma that comes along with it, the oppression and the history that people don’t want to admit to or take responsibility for, the constant dehumanization from your friends and society….that’s what we deal with DAILY. You get to put on a costume and pretend to be something you’re not without dealing with any of these consequences, I don’t. I don’t pretend to play Native, honey, I AM NATIVE. 
Now you need to take that tacky white lie off your body and stuff it in the garbage. You should feel ashamed. 
BTW: Headbands were never a part of ANY Native tribe. There’s nothing funny about this shit. 
For those of you who want less angry/more eloquent details on cultural appropriation, I suggest you go to these links to understand a little bit more before you make such a foolish, foolish mistake. 
Resources: 
Native Appropriations: But Why Can’t I Wear a Hipster Headdress? 
Native Appropriations:  An Open Letter to all the PocaHotties and Indian Warriors
antidotetocommonpoisons:

Thrifting adventures.
1. I bought a full Native American costume and the props to go with it. I just couldn’t resist. Hahaha
$18
2. A dress that magically transforms from 1970’s to 1870’s. I’m not sure why I got this, but I just thought it was kinda pretty. Maybe I’ll write a script for a video that includes the 1800’s or something.
$5
3. Super awesome brand new blazer.
$6
DON’T TREND ON MY CULTURE
Ok Everybody, 
This is specifically one of the reasons that Brutally Beautifull exists. We’re connecting racism and fashion, and here we have a prime example. I am Native American, more specifically I am a registered member of the Oglala Lakota tribe in South Dakota, the poorest county in the entire COUNTRY, I might add. 
Let’s break this down shall we?
1. I AM NOT A COSTUME. As a Native American, dressing up as a Native American when you are NOT and when you are WHITE is WRONG. Period. End of story. You’re wrong, deal with it. It’s extremely hurtful and racist and continues hundreds of years worth of colonialism and genocide that my people still suffer from today. 
2. Dressing up as a race/culture you are NOT is called Cultural Appropriation. One of the reasons this is so bad is that it generalizes Native peoples. There are over 500 recognized tribes in the USA alone, each with their own culture and stories and when you do this, it just reiterates the idea that
 A. It’s okay to dress as a make-believe indian.
 B. That we’re all the same. We’re not, and it’s really hurtful to see your identity  trivialized in such a horrific way. 
3. Dressing up as an “indian” is the same as dressing in Blackface. You know that blackface is wrong, but unfortunately society tells you it’s okay to dress like an Indian. It’s not. It’s JUST like blackface, and as a PoC (Person of Color) I’m telling you that it’s wrong. You need to realize that People of Color have the right to say what is and is not acceptable. I’m telling you as a Native who is thoroughly ACTIVE in my culture, traditions and tribe that it is NOT okay to dress up in such a racist manner. You need to take that opinion, stuff it in your pocket and keep it for later, girlfriend. We get to tell you what’s right and what’s wrong regarding our race. This is wrong. Don’t do it. 
4. When you dress up like “an Indian” then you further propagate the idea that we, as Native/Indigenous Peoples, don’t exist. You get to play Native without actually BEING Native. Don’t come to me with that “one drop indian” bullshit. It isn’t gonna fly here. Unless you know what tribe you come from, are an active participant in that culture and work to further the rights of your people, then that drop of Native blood don’t count for shit in any of our books. We’re not unicorns, mmk? We’re people with real issues going on and we can’t pick and choose which issues are more important than the other. Dressing up like Indians, as if it’s somehow trendy, is just telling of a larger ignorance on our country’s part. 
As Fatshionistas, we HAVE to be aware of what we are putting on our bodies. How shameful is it to put something on that so dehumanizes our fellow women, or people, just because we feel like we have the right to do it, their feelings be damned, the consequences be damned, while we are so stigmatized in this society as it is. If we are not helping our our fellow people, then we are hypocrites. End of story. You know what you put on your body before you do it, don’t claim ignorance as an excuse. 
5. The whole “Dressing up like other races” from white people is called Consuming The Other. You get to play brown. You get to be something exotic and exciting, but without suffering any read consequences that come along with being that race. My people were almost exterminated by this country, my reservation is the poorest in the country, the suicide rate is 400% higher than the rest of the country, the average income on my rez is $8,000 a year, half of the reservation has diabetes, etc. etc. etc. That’s part of being Native, my friend. All of the intergenerational trauma that comes along with it, the oppression and the history that people don’t want to admit to or take responsibility for, the constant dehumanization from your friends and society….that’s what we deal with DAILY. You get to put on a costume and pretend to be something you’re not without dealing with any of these consequences, I don’t. I don’t pretend to play Native, honey, I AM NATIVE. 
Now you need to take that tacky white lie off your body and stuff it in the garbage. You should feel ashamed. 
BTW: Headbands were never a part of ANY Native tribe. There’s nothing funny about this shit. 
For those of you who want less angry/more eloquent details on cultural appropriation, I suggest you go to these links to understand a little bit more before you make such a foolish, foolish mistake. 
Resources: 
Native Appropriations: But Why Can’t I Wear a Hipster Headdress? 
Native Appropriations:  An Open Letter to all the PocaHotties and Indian Warriors
antidotetocommonpoisons:

Thrifting adventures.
1. I bought a full Native American costume and the props to go with it. I just couldn’t resist. Hahaha
$18
2. A dress that magically transforms from 1970’s to 1870’s. I’m not sure why I got this, but I just thought it was kinda pretty. Maybe I’ll write a script for a video that includes the 1800’s or something.
$5
3. Super awesome brand new blazer.
$6

DON’T TREND ON MY CULTURE

Ok Everybody, 

This is specifically one of the reasons that Brutally Beautifull exists. We’re connecting racism and fashion, and here we have a prime example. I am Native American, more specifically I am a registered member of the Oglala Lakota tribe in South Dakota, the poorest county in the entire COUNTRY, I might add. 

Let’s break this down shall we?

1. I AM NOT A COSTUME. As a Native American, dressing up as a Native American when you are NOT and when you are WHITE is WRONG. Period. End of story. You’re wrong, deal with it. It’s extremely hurtful and racist and continues hundreds of years worth of colonialism and genocide that my people still suffer from today. 

2. Dressing up as a race/culture you are NOT is called Cultural Appropriation. One of the reasons this is so bad is that it generalizes Native peoples. There are over 500 recognized tribes in the USA alone, each with their own culture and stories and when you do this, it just reiterates the idea that

A. It’s okay to dress as a make-believe indian.

B. That we’re all the same. We’re not, and it’s really hurtful to see your identity trivialized in such a horrific way. 

3. Dressing up as an “indian” is the same as dressing in Blackface. You know that blackface is wrong, but unfortunately society tells you it’s okay to dress like an Indian. It’s not. It’s JUST like blackface, and as a PoC (Person of Color) I’m telling you that it’s wrong. You need to realize that People of Color have the right to say what is and is not acceptable. I’m telling you as a Native who is thoroughly ACTIVE in my culture, traditions and tribe that it is NOT okay to dress up in such a racist manner. You need to take that opinion, stuff it in your pocket and keep it for later, girlfriend. We get to tell you what’s right and what’s wrong regarding our race. This is wrong. Don’t do it. 

4. When you dress up like “an Indian” then you further propagate the idea that we, as Native/Indigenous Peoples, don’t exist. You get to play Native without actually BEING Native. Don’t come to me with that “one drop indian” bullshit. It isn’t gonna fly here. Unless you know what tribe you come from, are an active participant in that culture and work to further the rights of your people, then that drop of Native blood don’t count for shit in any of our books. We’re not unicorns, mmk? We’re people with real issues going on and we can’t pick and choose which issues are more important than the other. Dressing up like Indians, as if it’s somehow trendy, is just telling of a larger ignorance on our country’s part. 

As Fatshionistas, we HAVE to be aware of what we are putting on our bodies. How shameful is it to put something on that so dehumanizes our fellow women, or people, just because we feel like we have the right to do it, their feelings be damned, the consequences be damned, while we are so stigmatized in this society as it is. If we are not helping our our fellow people, then we are hypocrites. End of story. You know what you put on your body before you do it, don’t claim ignorance as an excuse. 

5. The whole “Dressing up like other races” from white people is called Consuming The Other. You get to play brown. You get to be something exotic and exciting, but without suffering any read consequences that come along with being that race. My people were almost exterminated by this country, my reservation is the poorest in the country, the suicide rate is 400% higher than the rest of the country, the average income on my rez is $8,000 a year, half of the reservation has diabetes, etc. etc. etc. That’s part of being Native, my friend. All of the intergenerational trauma that comes along with it, the oppression and the history that people don’t want to admit to or take responsibility for, the constant dehumanization from your friends and society….that’s what we deal with DAILY. You get to put on a costume and pretend to be something you’re not without dealing with any of these consequences, I don’t. I don’t pretend to play Native, honey, I AM NATIVE. 

Now you need to take that tacky white lie off your body and stuff it in the garbage. You should feel ashamed. 

BTW: Headbands were never a part of ANY Native tribe. There’s nothing funny about this shit. 

For those of you who want less angry/more eloquent details on cultural appropriation, I suggest you go to these links to understand a little bit more before you make such a foolish, foolish mistake. 

Resources: 

Native Appropriations: But Why Can’t I Wear a Hipster Headdress? 

Native Appropriations:  An Open Letter to all the PocaHotties and Indian Warriors

antidotetocommonpoisons:

Thrifting adventures.

1. I bought a full Native American costume and the props to go with it. I just couldn’t resist. Hahaha

  • $18

2. A dress that magically transforms from 1970’s to 1870’s. I’m not sure why I got this, but I just thought it was kinda pretty. Maybe I’ll write a script for a video that includes the 1800’s or something.

  • $5

3. Super awesome brand new blazer.

  • $6

(Source: nightbloomr)


For all you FAT activists out there! (edit: There are some people following me, THANK YOU! :P)

NOW THIS DOESN’T ALL GO TO WASTE! 

————————————————————————

Attention: Plus-sized people (and allies) who want to change the status quo!

We are bombarded with messages about our bodies and our health every day. We’re told to diet, no matter what that might do to our bodies. We’re told to wear clothes that “look slimming” no matter what that might do to our self esteem. We’re told to wait to be thinner before we do what we want, no matter what that might do to our lives.

And yet, there are lots of us who are working to change the status quo. Whether we do it through activism, or fashion, or exposing diet industry politics, or just finding ways to live our lives outside the boundaries that we’re supposed to accept, we are part of something bigger than ourselves. It is a revolution in the truest sense.

So Golda of Body Love Wellness has assembled a group of 20 (!) amazing people who are at the forefront of this revolution for this free telesummit. 

We’ve got Dr. Linda Bacon talking about the science of Health At Every Size (R), we’ve got Paul Campos talking about diet politics, we’ve got Marilyn Wann talking activism, we’ve got IGIGI founder Yuliya Raquel talking fatshion and that’s just the beginning. 

You can register for free and get free access to the live calls and access to the download of the call for 24 hours, or you can get a sliding scale all access pass to the downloads through March 30th.

REGISTER HERE: HTTP://WWW.BODYLOVEREVOLUTION.COM

SCHEDULE (Full schedule is at HTTP://WWW.BODYLOVEREVOLUTION.COM) :

1/31 — FAT ACTIVISM with Peggy Howell, Amanda Levitt & Marilyn Wann

2/2 — FAT HEALTH with Linda Bacon & Ragen Chastain

2/7 — FATSHION with Marie Denee, Rachel Kacenjar, & Yuliya Raquel

2/9 — FAT SEX with Hanne Blank & Virgie Tovar

2/16 — FAT BLOGGING & SOCIAL MEDIA with Marianne Kirby, Margitte Leah Kristjansson & Brian Stuart

2/21 — FAT FITNESS with Jeanette DePatie & Anna Guest-Jelley

2/23 — FAT/QUEER INTERSECTIONS with Bevin Branlandingham, Charlotte Cooper, & Jessica Luxery

2/28 — FAT POLITICS & HISTORY with Paul Campos & Amy Erdman Farrell


My body is not a representation of my failures, sins, or mistakes. My body is not a sign that I am in poor health, or that I am not physically fit. My body is not up for public discussion, debate or judgment. My body is not a signal that I need your help or input to make decisions about my health or life. My body is the constant companion that helps me do every single thing that I do every second of every day and it deserves respect and admiration. If you are incapable of appreciating my body that is your deficiency, not mine, and I do not care. Nor am I interested in hearing your thoughts on the matter so, if you want to be around me, you are 100% responsible for doing whatever it takes to keep those thoughts to yourself. If you are incapable of doing that I will leave and spend my time with people who can treat me appropriately. Please pass the green beans.

Avoid Holiday Weight Shame — Ragen (danceswithfat)